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The Early Days

Toward an empirical theory of consciousness for artificial intelligence

About

Thank you for checking out my blog! My name is Molly and I am interested in combining research from cognitive psychology and neuroscience with philosophical perspectives to aid in the design of various AI systems. I was introduced to computer programming a few years after high school and took courses on software development at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. After studying and working in the industry for a few years, I became very interested in the human mind and the future of AI. I attended the University of Toronto and graduated with a Bachelor of Science after working on a double major in Psychology and Philosophy. One day I hope to acquire a graduate degree in Philosophy of Mind, and eventually, work with a team of individuals from a variety of academic and professional backgrounds to further the creation of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) and Artificial Consciousness (AC).

All information I present is intended to be accurate and honest, and I strive to maintain this by balancing evidence-based critical thinking with healthy scepticism. From a perspective rooted in evolutionary theory, I am eager to find candidate answers to our oldest questions on consciousness as a way to begin conceptualizing AC. I welcome polite feedback and always enjoy discussing different points of view, so feel free to email your questions or comments. I also believe in giving credit where it’s due, so if I have missed an opportunity to cite the work of others, kindly reach out and I will make any necessary changes or additions.

Feelings surrounding ‘the future’ and how changes in technology will impact humanity seem to involve both intimidation and excitement. At first, it seems anything is possible but that implies we are responsible for it, requiring planning, effort, and possibly delayed gratification. This can be pretty hard for some people, especially when our current capitalistic environment encourages impulsive behaviours. There is a lot of incentive right now for companies and organizations to continuously push development in order to make an impact within a blossoming market. I worry a lot about things like the rigor of the testing process or how successive generations will be affected. There are a lot of succinct questions with difficult answers, and a lot of difficult questions with seemingly easy answers. Remaining passive allows those with fewer scruples to take advantage of risk-laden “opportunities”, so proper measures must be adopted before new technologies catch on and outpace the introduction of new laws. Global standards must be set now to prevent potential human rights violations, some of the most vital being transparency and accountability.